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Voodoo Priest at Seko Healing Shrine, Togo
In their renowned photographic exhibition African Ceremonies: Passages, Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher have recorded the rich texture of ceremonial life in Africa ranging from the naming of babies and the courtship of young adults to displays of royal wealth and power, healing practices and funeral ceremonies.  The exhibition presents a selection of striking images illustrating the vital role of rites of passage in Africa marking the progression of individuals and communities throughout the universal cycle of life from birth to death.

 

Beckwith and Fisher photographed sacred ceremonies and traditions little known to the outside world. There are no other artists who have captured so many images of authentic and ancient ritual practices.  African Ceremonies: Passages features photographs of the cycle of life in Africa, as well as the spiritual beliefs of its societies. The photographs are grouped throughout the exhibition according to birth and initiation, courtship and marriage, royalty and power, seasonal rites, beliefs and worship, and finally death and passage to the spirit world.

 

Beckwith and Fisher photographed sacred ceremonies and traditions little known to the outside world. There are no other artists who have captured so many images of authentic and ancient ritual practices. African Ceremonies: Passages features photographs of the cycle of life in Africa, as well as the spiritual beliefs of its societies. The photographs are grouped throughout the exhibition according to birth and initiation, courtship and marriage, royalty and power, seasonal rites, beliefs and worship, and finally death and passage to the spirit world.

 

The photographers’ non-profit foundation, African Ceremonies, Inc, in conjunction with The Art Project, part of the Google Cultural Institute website, is presenting the exhibition online. African Ceremonies is dedicated to the preservation of African tribal traditions through the photographic documentation of ceremonies and customs, thereby ensuring that the strength and essence of African culture is preserved for the history of mankind and for the education of future generations. The Google Cultural Institute is dedicated to creating technology that helps the cultural community to bring their art, archives, heritage sites and other material online. The aim is to increase the range and volume of cultural material  that is available for people to explore online and in doing so, democratize access to it and preserve it for future generations. To date, more than 6 million viewers have explored the GCI site and its extensive cultural resources.

One Response to New Google Site Presents African Ceremonies: Passages Exhibition

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  1. Tatiana says:

    Your art is marvelous. I am impressed how beautifully you captured these moments and feelings. I hope one day you can bring your art to be exposed in Brazil.
    Best regards from a fan from Sao Paulo,
    Tatiana Paes

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